You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘smoking’ tag.

In what has to be one of the more stupid things we have seen in quite some time. Yahoo Answers has lost their moral compass in publishing an entry titled:

How do you smoke a cigarette.

Not only is it irresponsible but it is leading others to smoke through this virtual enabling of young smoker wannabe’s. Hey Yahoo, wake up and take this down! T

yahoo1

Advertisements

Not if you saw what was going on inside the human body every time you took a drag.

stop-smoking-ads

stop-smoking-ads-1

Think you know what’s up when it comes to cigarette smoking and its effects? Better think again!

1. Myth: Nicotine causes cancer.

Fact: Nicotine is not a carcinogen. However, there are 4,000 known chemicals in cigarettes, and more than 60 of them are carcinogens.

2. Myth: Smoking is just a bad habit that you can stop at any time.

Fact: There is a habit component to smoking, but there are also biological changes to the brain that create the addiction.

Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which occur naturally in the brain, are activated when nicotine is consumed. The activation period is followed by a desensitized state in which the receptors become unresponsive. As more nicotine is consumed, and the number of unresponsive receptors increases, the smoker experiences less pleasure from each cigarette. This makes it necessary to increase the number of cigarettes smoked to achieve the desired level of pleasure.

3. Myth: Low nicotine cigarettes are safer.

Fact: The blend of tobacco in a low nicotine cigarette is exactly the same as in a regular cigarette. The reason cigarette companies can call them “low” has to do with the way nicotine levels are tested.

As the regulator of cigarettes, the Federal Trade Commission tests for nicotine and tar levels with machines that draw air through a cigarette in two-second puffs, repeated once per minute, until the cigarette is burned to the filter. The smoke that is generated in this manner tests low in nicotine.

However, this test doesn’t approximate the way people really smoke. Smokers will compensate for the lower yield of nicotine by puffing more, or taking longer drags. Consequently, the smoker will actually inhale the same or more nicotine and tar, even though it is considered a low-nicotine cigarette.

Another reason the machine tests are considered inaccurate is cigarette manufacturers put ventilation holes in the filters. These holes allow more air to be drawn in, which dilutes the smoke going into the machine, making it seem as though the cigarette being tested contains less tar and nicotine. But when people actually smoke these cigarettes, their fingers generally cover the holes in the filters.

4. Myth: Medicinal nicotine found in nicotine patches and nicotine gum is just as addictive as smoking.

Fact: The delivery system used to bring nicotine to the brain is what determines the level of addictiveness. Medicinal nicotine is released slowly through the venous system. The brain receives only small quantities, reducing the potential for addiction.

Inhaling brings nicotine to the brain extremely fast, which is why it is so addictive.

“Inhaling gets nicotine to the brain within five heartbeats,” Hurt said.

5. Myth: A smoker who tries to quit without assistance can maintain abstinence over the long term.

Fact: Chances of long-term abstinence for smokers who try to go it alone are less than 5 percent. With assistance, the smoker’s chance of staying away from cigarettes increases to 30 to 35 percent.

 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 44.5 million US adults were current smokers in 2006 (the most recent year for which numbers are available). This is 20.8% of all adults (23.9% of men, 18.0% of women) — more than 1 out of 5 people.

When broken down by race/ethnicity, the numbers were as follows:

Whites 21.9%
African Americans 23.0%
Hispanics 15.2%
American Indians/Alaska Natives 32.4%
Asian Americans 10.4%

The numbers were higher in younger age groups. In 2006, CDC reported almost 24% of those 18 to 44 years old were current smokers, compared to 10.2% in those aged 65 or older.

Nationwide, 22.3% of high school students and 8.1% of middle school students were smoking in 2004. More White and Hispanic students smoked cigarettes.  Can anyone tell me why the highest percentages would among American Indians and native Alaskans?

 

 

20 reasons to quit smoking American Cancer Society anti-smoking big tobacco britney spears cancer cancer and cell phones cancer news cancer studies cdc celebrities who smoke chantix cigarette labels cigarettes cigarette smoking disney stop smoking every time you smoke Ex facts about smoking famous people who smoke famous people who smoked and died because of it fire safe cigarettes goofy health and smoking how to quit smoking how to stop smoking international smoking news no smoking videos obama obesity and smoking preventing children from smoking preventing smoking in chidlren questions about smoking quit meters. quitting smoking aides quit smoking quit smoking action plan quit smoking guidelines quit smoking in 2009 quit smoking initiatives quit smoking movies quit smoking products quit smoking sites quit smoking support quit smoking tips quit smoking videos quit smoking vidoes quit smoking websites quitting smoking quitting smoking in the new year quitting smoking reasons Qutting Smoking qutting smoking for new years qutting smoking news Reasons to quit smoking second hand smoke smokeaway smoke away smoke away support smokeaway support smokers quiz smoking smoking addiction smoking and chidlren Smoking and Children smoking and teens smoking cessation smoking cessation steps smoking cessation videos smoking effects smoking in the workplace smoking myths Smoking News smoking quiz smoking related illness smoking stat Smoking Statistics steps to quit smoking Stopping smoking stopping smoking for the new year stop smoking stop smoking ads stop smoking aides stop smoking assistance stop smoking for kids stop smoking for new years stop smoking help stop smoking in 2008 stop smoking links stop smoking meters stop smoking news stop smoking products stop smoking programs stop smoking quiz stop smoking resources stop smoking support Stop Smoking Tips stop smoking tips for 2009 stop smoking tools stop smoking video Stop Smoking Videos the american cancer society the reasons why people smoke tips to quit smoking ways to help someone quit smoking Ways to quit smoking ways to quit smoking in the new year ways to stop smoking what happens when you stop smoking women and smoking yahoo answers you tube stop smoking videos
Advertisements